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Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons

Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons

Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons

  • Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons
  • Siegfried Engelmann
  • Phyllis Haddox
  • Elaine Bruner
  • Reading

Is your child halfway through first grade and still unable to read? Is your preschooler bored with coloring and ready for reading? Do you want to help your child read, but are afraid you’ll do something wrong? SRAs DISTAR® is the most successful beginning reading program available to schools across the country. Research has proven that children taught by the DISTAR® method outperform their peers who receive instruction from other programs. Now for the first time, this program has been adapted

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3 Responses to “Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons”

  1. Arbela "Amazon Woman" says:
    451 of 458 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    This book is WONDERFUL!, July 14, 2000
    This review is from: Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons (Paperback)
    I’m so impressed with how this book was put together. The lessons are fool proof for the parent, as they are written with detailed directions. New sounds are gradually worked into previously mastered tasks so that the child is never given more than he/she can handle (this does wonders for my daughter’s reading confidence). Before you know it, your child is reading three and four paragraphs, and the process of getting there wasn’t painful at all!
    One note: I have read other reviews from parents using this book with 3 and 4 year olds. Certainly, if your preschooler shows an interest in reading, this book is an excellent choice. But NOTHING will work unless your child is READY to learn, not even “100 Lessons.” Reading readiness happens at different ages (like every other milestone in childhood), and we as parents must respect our children’s personal timetables (difficult to do sometimes, I know). Hey, remember when WE were in kindergarten? We spent our days playing, painting, napping (do they even nap anymore these days). Reading came along in first grade, and many of us may not have been ready to learn until then.
    That said, buy the book and use it when your particular family is ready ~ ENJOY! :o)

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  2. James LeMay says:
    550 of 564 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Ignore the slow start, this book really works!, October 25, 2002
    By 
    James LeMay (Lake Forest, IL United States) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons (Paperback)
    This book starts painfully slowly, but my advice is “hold on.” At first, I couldn’t stand the agonizingly plodding pace. And it wasn’t just impatient me. My three year old didn’t see the point of saying the list of words as slowly. But we gave it a chance anyway, after all the good Amazon reviews and marketing hype on the book itself. By a quarter of the way through, we began to look forward to reading time. One small addition I made to the scripted course was to invite in stuffed animal guest teachers (see suggestion 1 below). It worked like a charm.
    I love the way the parent’s part is scripted. The script turns anyone who can read into a patient, supportive master teacher! I love the way all sorts of short activities make up each lesson – very balanced. Best of all is the way this book’s lessons touch all the bases. They connect letter sounds with words with stories with writing and finally, with reading comprehension, the point of the whole exercise. I really appreciate the short stories and the picture from the story with discussion questions. Now that I’ve talked to some teachers, this balanced, comprehensive approach is a perfect way to start a child reading. It doesn’t lack any aspect that they will use later, or emphasize one to the exclusion of the others.
    I didn’t expect the writing, but I am very happy that it’s in there. I bought the book for my three year old, but I am putting my 5 year old through it too, because it is so complete and methodical.
    When I first saw the phonetic alphabet, I thought it was a little strange. But my child has no trouble recognizing the joined “sh” symbol as an “s” and an “h.” And the “sh” is a single sound in his mind, as are “s” and “h.” The notation caused us no problem at all, and I only mention it because another reviewer found it problematic. We did not. Likewise, I wasn’t disturbed by short e not being mentioned sooner. Who cares? The order presented was gradual, and as logical as any other.(Although it led to a lot of stories about ants.)
    I would also offer a few suggestions:
    1. If your child loves his or her stuffed animals (or Power Rangers, etc.), then you can use them to be “guest teachers.” When I started with this book, I hadn’t yet come up with this diversionary tactic, and sometimes working through a lesson was harder than it needed to be. With a beanie baby teaching, my three year old is far more interested in the lessons. My boy picks which animals will help each night, and then he listens intently to them. They help sound out words, rhyme, and watch him write. They are much more interesting than old Daddy, as they are allowed to have excessive personality! When it is time to find certain words in the story, my son doesn’t like to just point to the requested word. He prefers to race the beanie-baby guest teacher to the words. (The beanie baby invariably loses.) When it is time to write letters, the beanie baby counts them in Spanish. And so on.
    2. Check out some of the “We Both Read” books to supplement toward the end of this book. The “We Both Read” series has a complicated left page for the adult, and a simple right page for the child. You take turns reading, and continue the “reading together” experience beyond the 100 easy lessons.
    So after a slow and frustrating start, which in retrospect was absolutely necessary, we both look forward to our daily reading time. We brought in the beanie babies to inject the missing element of fun. I know Matthew will have a solid foundation in all the parts of written communication, and Matthew likes the fact that his favorite stuffed animals are teaching him to read.
    Five stars. Awaiting “Human Relationships in 100 Easy Lessons.”

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  3. JN Trotter says:
    827 of 865 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Great book – but don’t fall for the 100 “easy 20min” lesson, March 13, 2000
    By 
    JN Trotter (Pittsford, NY United States) –

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons (Paperback)
    I had to write this after reading the rave reviews from parents of 3 year olds who taught their kids to read in 12 min. a night in less than 3 months. Don’t buy this book if that is what you expect.
    Don’t get me wrong this is a GREAT book. I highly recommend it. But, it is NOT EASY (at least not for every child).
    My nearly 5 begged “Please, please teach me to read Mommy”. After about 20 lessons of this book she begged “Please, please I don’t want to read”. So we put it aside for a few months. When she asked to start again we started over at lesson 1 and went more slowly. We reviewed the previous lesson, did a new lesson, read a “Bob Book”,played letter bingo. Some days we didn’t do a new lesson – we just read a “Bob book” or reviewed an old lesson. YOU HAVE TO GO AT YOUR KIDS PACE. TAKE YOUR CUES FROM YOUR CHILD.
    We’re on lesson 94. I don’t know if she reads at a 2nd grade level and I don’t care. She is reading and excited about reading – and that’s what it’s all about.

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